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Safer Streets Crime Action Plan – Youth Justice

The Government is committed to breaking the cycle of youth crime.

Queensland is a great state with a strong justice system. But there are opportunities to make Queensland communities safer and provide ways for young people to reach their full potential.

A Youth Justice Action Plan has now been developed. This plan introduces a broad review of the youth justice system through 2013-14. From here, a Blueprint for the Future of Youth Justice in Queensland will be developed and delivered.

As part of this review the Queensland Government sought feedback about the types of reforms Queenslanders want to see to address crime issues in Queensland. Feedback was invited through a survey and written submissions.

The consultation concluded on June 30.

Crime Survey outcomes

As of 1 July 2013, there had been 4184 respondents to the survey. Of those that answered:

  • 63.4% of the respondents were female
  • nearly half of the respondents (47.1%) were aged 40-65 years
  • 76.8% of respondents had been a victim, or had a family member who was a victim, of a crime. Of these, 37.3% reported that this victimisation occurred in the last 12 months.

Figure 1 shows the proportions of respondents rating interventions as 'quite effective' or 'very effective' in preventing youth crime and making Queensland safer. In terms of the crime prevention initiatives identified in the survey, providing education and employment (77.5%), providing better support to children experiencing violence and neglect (76.8%), and providing treatment to tackle drug addiction (73.7%) were seen as the most effective interventions.

Figure 1: Respondents were asked their opinions on the effectiveness of the following crime prevention initiatives in preventing youth crime and making Queensland safer

Youth

Figure 2 shows the proportions of respondents rating reforms as 'quite effective' or 'very effective' in preventing youth crime and making Queensland safer. In terms of current and proposed reforms identified in the survey, early intervention and prevention (75.4%), employment programs (71.1%), and making it an offence for a child to breach their bail conditions (66.3%) were seen as the most effective reforms.

Figure 2: Respondents were asked their opinions on the effectiveness of the following proposed reforms in preventing youth crime and making Queensland safer

Youth
Last reviewed
18 July 2013
Last updated
18 July 2013

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