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Who we do systems advocacy for

We do systems advocacy to benefit all Queensland adults who may have impaired decision-making capacity.

Impaired decision-making capacity is the inability to make a decision, communicate a decision and/or put that decision into effect.

Impaired decision-making capacity may arise because of:

  • dementia
  • ageing conditions
  • intellectual disability
  • acquired brain injury
  • mental illness
  • conditions associated with alcohol and drug use
  • other conditions that may impair a person’s cognition or decision-making ability.

Not all people with these conditions will have impaired decision-making capacity.

Impaired decision-making capacity does not necessarily impact all areas of a person’s life. A person may be able to make some decisions, but not others. A person’s ability to make decisions may vary at different times or in different situations.

The people who we help

Who we help is not restricted to people who:

  • get services that are provided or funded by government
  • are in the guardianship system.

The group of people we work to help is much larger.

We do not know the exact number of people in Queensland who may have impaired decision-making capacity. However, we use the Survey of Disability Aging and Carers and population projection data to calculate an estimate.

We estimate that in 2016 there may be up to 118,700 adults (1 in 40 people) with impaired decision-making capacity in Queensland. This number is expected to increase to around 151,600 people (1 in 39 people) by 2026.

The potential population for systems advocacy provides information about the estimated number and type of people who may have impaired decision-making capacity.

Contact us

See more contact details

Last reviewed
29 July 2016
Last updated
29 July 2016

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